En fin

And here we are.

I leave tomorrow night. At about 10 PM Santiago time, we should be taxi-ing/in the air on our way to Miami. We did the same thing 5 months ago: we took off in summer and landed in winter.

I remember that first morning surprisingly well considering how sleep-deprived and disoriented I was. I remember being rushed through customs and the impatience of the officer. I remember coming through customs, being approached by a man who I thought said something that sounded like my university’s name, and then his taking my bags and leading me out to my group. I remember buying a water and paying for it in pesos for the first time. I remember that it really was colder than we thought it was going to be. I remember we had two lunches that day and we were so unbelievably full. I remember a scalding hot stream of water in the shower, contrasted by the chill of my room in the retreat house.

There was Linares, which I wrote about extensively. And then, after what felt like a long two weeks, we came to Santiago. I remember how quiet I was during my first couple weeks in my house as I tried to figure out my family and my place there; trying not to fall over on my first metro ride; getting back into a school routine, but in another language; and learning some of the in’s and out’s of Chilean night life.

This is a little bit of what a normal morning looked like here in Santiago:

What the mountains looked like on a late winter morning.

What the mountains looked like on a late winter morning.

I love these egg pans. I had scrambled eggs most mornings for about three months. Also, it took me until October to light the stove by myself. Please don't judge.

I love these egg pans. I had scrambled eggs most mornings for about three months. Also, it took me until October to light the stove by myself. Please don’t judge.

My metro stop. The farthest east the metro goes.

My metro stop. The farthest east the metro goes.

Campus. Not a very descriptive photo, but then again, I never found campus all that pretty nor interesting. But I thought the way the trees lined the sidewalks was nice.

Campus. Not a very descriptive photo, but then again, I never found campus all that pretty nor interesting. But I thought the way the trees lined the sidewalks was nice.

And here’s what the end of the day looked like on one of my last days here:

Heading west on the carretera. This is the daylight at about 8:15 PM. Coming home to darkness at 5 will be hard.

Heading west on the carretera. This is the daylight at about 8:15 PM. Coming home to darkness at 5 will be hard.

End of the day sun over el Río Mapocho.

End of the day sun over el Río Mapocho.

Here’s a quick photo recap of the different places I visited over these 5 months:

Outside of Linares.

Outside of Linares.

Embalse Ancoa, Linares.

Embalse Ancoa, Linares.

Rabones.

Rabones.

Constitución.

Constitución.

A view of Santiago from Cerro Santa Lucía.

A view of Santiago from Cerro Santa Lucía.

View of the sea from La Isla Negra.

View of the sea from La Isla Negra.

Late winter sunset, Santiago.

Late winter sunset, Santiago.

Viña Concha y Toro, Santiago.

Viña Concha y Toro, Santiago.

Pomaire.

Pomaire.

A very rainy Valparaíso.

A very rainy Valparaíso.

Pintué.

Pintué.

Cajón de Maipo.

Cajón de Maipo.

La Ermita, on horseback.

La Ermita, on horseback.

Chiloé.

Chiloé.

Valdivia.

Valdivia.

And that, my friends, was a little bit of what I saw on study abroad, Fall 2012.

I’ve taken it easy my last few days. Some people like to blow it out. I, however, considering how close I feel to my family and that I am just now getting over that darn cold, have kept close to home. I went out with a few people I hadn’t been able to get together with yet. I went to Mass for the last time with my family. I made pancakes and muffins. I said goodbye to my program directors on campus. I packed. And I cried about five times in the process. (Thank you, F., for coming by and helping out! I would not be as close to done as I am now if you had not been there.)

I think I’m going through a lot of the same emotions I felt when I left the States. That I was leaving home, that it was going to be a long time until I saw my family, that I had so much left still to do. I’m glad I have all of these mixed emotions, though. I think it’s a good sign. I should be this excited to go home, and this sad to leave. Obviously, there’d be something wrong if I weren’t happy to go home and see my family after- again- 5 months. And I think it points to how great an experience I’ve had that I’m so sad to go, when it feels like things could just be getting started.

But that’s a little how life is, isn’t it? I will write more about this around New Year’s (more about that in a later post), but I had a long conversation with my host mom the other night, and she gave me some very good advice, which comes down to this: say yes more. You really do only get so much time in one place. Make the most of it. I wouldn’t change my experience and the relationships I’ve formed for anything. But the way the time has flown has reminded me, in a very hard way, how you’ve gotta take your chances when you have them. I think that’s going to be a kind of mantra for me in the next year.

Before I get too sappy, I want to let you know that the blog will continue. The transition back home is indeed a part of the study abroad experience. And we all know how I love transitions. I also love (probably too much) baking and cooking things and then talking about it and posting pictures of it. I have up to 15 cookie recipes I’d like to try for Christmas, plus other things. So that’ll be happening here as well. Beyond that, we’ll just see how it goes!

I went to theater camp almost every summer of my life from when I was 5 until I was 18. We ended every summer by saying thank you to the people who had supported us throughout the summer. It was very emotional and sometimes a little cheesy, but I always loved it. Doing that kind of thing remains very important to me, and I would like to do that right here, right now.

Thank you to all of my readers! Thank you for letting me share my adventures and everyday life with you. I hope you’ll stick around once I’m back stateside doing less interesting things like baking and being a college student.

Thank you to the blogs that I follow for being such a big inspiration and brightening my day when I needed a distraction or a pick-me-up. (My top three favorites are on the blogroll sidebar.)

Thank you to my friends and groupmates. We were very lucky to be together and get along the way we did. Thanks for being you.

Thank you, F. Something bigger put us here together. We were made friends for a reason. I will miss you like crazy when you are back here next semester and I…am not.

Thank you to our program directors. Not everybody gets someone on-site who handles problems with classes, finds them a family, organizes field trips, and so on. Thanks for all of your hard work!

Thank you to my Chilean friends and acquaintances. Thanks for your patience with my Spanish when it doesn’t always come out the way it should, and thanks for bringing around places gringos don’t usually get to see. I hope to come back as soon as I can so I can spend more time with you!

Thank you to my host family. You were pretty much just what I needed you to be this semester. Thank you for replacing the down key on my computer; for taking me to Mass; for rejoicing in the deliciousness that is s’mores; for teasing me; for dragging me into your room when I clearly needed to talk but was too scared to bother to you; for letting me borrow your nail polish and hair products; for making my lunch every day; for being entirely too worried by my colds; for bringing me breakfast in bed; for making me café con leche exactly the way I like it; for giving me an iPhone, for my safety, of course; for showing me how the metro works; for eating chocolate and talking forever after dinner; for reviewing my papers; for letting me study with you; for making me feel like a real part of your family. The tears you will see in the airport tomorrow will hopefully show you how much I love the three of you and how much I will miss you.

Thank you, most of all, to my real family. I can’t even attempt to list all the things you do for me. You support me in more ways that I even know, and without that, I could not have gone away and had this experience. I cannot wait to see you and make you more cookies than you will want to eat.

Santiago. Chile. South America: I’m coming back for you. And that’s a promise.

My cup overflows. Time to get off the internet and drink up what’s left.

With love,

Gaby

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One response to “En fin

  1. Pingback: Getting through / Sobreviviendo | Charlando

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